MaD Launches Its Nutrition Program

 

                          With the arrival of several thousand Moringa Oleifera seeds today, MaD is now ready to officially launch the pilot project for our new Nutrition Program. Cambodia has one of the highest rates of malnutrition in the Asia Pacific region, with 26% of the population suffering from malnutrition and 45% of children suffering from moderate or severe stunting as a direct result. This program has been designed with the aim of fostering a local, sustainable solution to this problem by promoting the cultivation and consumption of Moringa Oleifera trees and amaranth grain amongst rural communities. 

morn

Called (Daem) M’Rum in Khmer, the Moringa Oleifera tree has been labelled the ‘Miracle Tree’ due to its exceptionally high nutritional content and its ability to grow in even the harshest of environments. The tree also has countless medicinal uses, its pods can purify water and can be used to extract a rich and valuable oil and parts of it can even be used as a bio-fertiliser for other crops! We’ve prepared a little promotional document explaining why we think Moringa holds such a huge amount of potential to aid impoverished rural communities in Cambodia, and you can read it here.

We have been experimenting with growing Moringa trees for some months now and have already learnt a huge amount about the best ways in which to grow them in the Cambodian climate. We now have two growing strongly on our property and another 6 growing in pots which are now also ready to be transplanted into the soil in our gardens. 

After a lot of research, we’ve also decided to incorporate amaranth grain into this program. Similar to Moringa, amaranth grain crops have been hailed as key players in the fight against malnutrition in developing country as the plants can meet between 75-87% of human nutritional needs and they are very adaptable to growing in the poor soils that are found throughout many developing countries. Amaranth grain holds a huge amount of potential for a country like Cambodia as it can simply be cooked in the pot with rice (Cambodia’s staple diet) and therefore provide a meal as rich in protein as one with red meat, poultry or chicken. You can read more about amaranth here.

Unlike M’Rum, which grows locally here, amaranth grain has yet to be grown in Cambodia. However we have been in touch with ECHO Asia who have had success in growing it in Thailand and have very kindly agreed to send us some seeds from their seed bank.

In this project we will establish a nursery of around 1,000 Moringa trees and as many amaranth grain crops as we can and we will then transplant them to families in Prolit village and will train them how to cultivate them, harvest them and prepare them to eat. So we will soon start planting our Moringa Oleifera seeds and, once we receive the amaranth seeds we will also start to experiment with growing them in the Cambodian environment, with the aim of developing a large nursery of amaranth nearer the end of the rainy season. If you would like to read the full project plan for this project, you can do so here

We have partnered with Ecodana in order to try and raise funds for this project and we very much need support to raise the necessary funds to put it into action. Ecodana runs on a microdonations basis, so even if you can only donate $5 it would be of huge assistance to us and will very quickly bring us towards our funding goal for the first stage of this project. You can donate here.

More updates to follow very soon!

With the arrival of several thousand Moringa Oleifera seeds today, MaD is now ready to officially launch the pilot project for our new Nutrition Program. Cambodia has one of the highest rates of malnutrition in the Asia Pacific region, with 26% of the population suffering from malnutrition and 45% of children suffering from moderate or severe stunting as a direct result. This program has been designed with the aim of fostering a local, sustainable solution to this problem by promoting the cultivation and consumption of Moringa Oleifera trees and amaranth grain amongst rural communities. 

Called (Daem) M’Rum in Khmer, the Moringa Oleifera tree has been labelled the ‘Miracle Tree’ due to its exceptionally high nutritional content and its ability to grow in even the harshest of environments. The tree also has countless medicinal uses, its pods can purify water and can be used to extract a rich and valuable oil and parts of it can even be used as a bio-fertiliser for other crops! We’ve prepared a little promotional document explaining why we think Moringa holds such a huge amount of potential to aid impoverished rural communities in Cambodia, and you can read it here.

We have been experimenting with growing Moringa trees for some months now and have already learnt a huge amount about the best ways in which to grow them in the Cambodian climate. We now have two growing strongly on our property and another 6 growing in pots which are now also ready to be transplanted into the soil in our gardens. 

After a lot of research, we’ve also decided to incorporate amaranth grain into this program. Similar to Moringa, amaranth grain crops have been hailed as key players in the fight against malnutrition in developing country as the plants can meet between 75-87% of human nutritional needs and they are very adaptable to growing in the poor soils that are found throughout many developing countries. Amaranth grain holds a huge amount of potential for a country like Cambodia as it can simply be cooked in the pot with rice (Cambodia’s staple diet) and therefore provide a meal as rich in protein as one with red meat, poultry or chicken. You can read more about amaranth here.

Unlike M’Rum, which grows locally here, amaranth grain has yet to be grown in Cambodia. However we have been in touch with ECHO Asia who have had success in growing it in Thailand and have very kindly agreed to send us some seeds from their seed bank.

In this project we will establish a nursery of around 1,000 Moringa trees and as many amaranth grain crops as we can and we will then transplant them to families in Prolit village and will train them how to cultivate them, harvest them and prepare them to eat. So we will soon start planting our Moringa Oleifera seeds and, once we receive the amaranth seeds we will also start to experiment with growing them in the Cambodian environment, with the aim of developing a large nursery of amaranth nearer the end of the rainy season. If you would like to read the full project plan for this project, you can do so here

We have partnered with Ecodana in order to try and raise funds for this project and we very much need support to raise the necessary funds to put it into action. Ecodana runs on a microdonations basis, so even if you can only donate $5 it would be of huge assistance to us and will very quickly bring us towards our funding goal for the first stage of this project. You can donate here.

More updates to follow very soon!